Leonard Nimoy

To Slowly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before: In Defense of ‘Star Trek: The Motion Picture’
To Slowly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before: In Defense of ‘Star Trek: The Motion Picture’
The poster for Star Trek: The Motion Picture is so dramatic. The faces of William Shatner’s Captain Kirk, Leonard Nimoy’s Mr. Spock, and Persis Khambatta’s Lieutenant Ilia refracted through a rainbow spectrum of light. That image promises excitement beyond imagination. Adventure! Passion! Every color under the rainbow!
Theory Salutes Nimoy
Theory Salutes Nimoy
Chuck Lorre may insist upon his vanity cards ending all of the episodes of The Big Bang Theory, but even he is willing to give up the prime spot to honor a man who was clearly one of the inspirations for the series and its characters: Leonard Nimoy.
Read Zachary Quinto’s Heartbreaking Tribute to Leonard Nimoy
Read Zachary Quinto’s Heartbreaking Tribute to Leonard Nimoy
When he passed away last week at the age of 83, Leonard Nimoy was mourned by actors, artists, politicians, scientists, engineers, astronauts and even the President of the United States. That should tell you something. Few characters have had such a seismic impact on popular culture as Star Trek’s Spock and countless people all over the world felt like they had lost a friend. Amidst the countless tributes, there is now one that stands out: a brief but powerful remembrance from Zachary Quinto, who picked up the Spock mantle in 2009’s Star Trek and its sequel, Star Trek Into Darkness.
Boldly Go Through This Video Collection of Leonard Nimoy’s Career Highlights
Boldly Go Through This Video Collection of Leonard Nimoy’s Career Highlights
The late, great Leonard Nimoy, who died earlier today at the age of 83, will always be Mr. Spock, second-in-command of the USS Enterprise under Captain James T. Kirk. For a long time, Nimoy was not okay with this. And then, over the years, he embraced the character that defined his career and inspired an entire generation of fans (many of whom became scientists, engineers, and astronauts). But Nimoy didn't just sit back and rest on his Vulcan laurels. When he wasn't wearing those pointy ears, Nimoy was acting, directing, writing, singing, and lending his likeness and distinctive voice to commercials and TV specials. He was a real Hollywood renaissance man, dabbling in high art, low art, and everything in-between.